Somerset Celebrates its Great Outdoors

April 28, 2011 at 12:07 pm EST
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In Somerset, with little exception, recreation centers on the great outdoors. From golfing to camping, Somerset has made recreation a family oriented pastime. It also helps that when father and son want to bond with rod and reel in hand, they have easy access to one of the biggest man-made lakes in the region.

Fishing as a Way of Life

Every spring and summer, boaters and anglers from as near as Lexington and as far as Cincinnati are lured to Lake Cumberland. Adjectives such as picturesque, pristine and tranquil have long been used to describe the lake. People come from miles around to enjoy nature, fun, and relaxation.

Many entertainment opportunities run the gamut of outdoor recreation, from boating, waterskiing and jet skiing to fishing, camping and hiking. Ronnie Keith, environmental protection specialist with the Army Corps of Engineers, can attest to all the recreation the lake has to offer.
“One activity that has become especially popular with boaters is exploring the many coves along the lake, and then dropping anchor for the day when you find an ideal location,” Keith says. “As for fishing, Lake Cumberland is an angler’s dream, complete with walleye, trout, rockfish, bream and several species of bass, including Kentucky bass.”
Keith says house boating has also become a popular pastime, with thousands of vacationers annually utilizing the lake in that way.

Not Just a Fishing Town

When Kentuckians speak about outdoors, they aren’t just talking about the lake. The Somerset district of the Daniel Boone National Forest contains picnic areas for family get-togethers, wilderness areas to explore (hunting and fishing permitted in accordance with state regulations) and rivers that range from canoe-friendly to challenging.

Camping is popular as well. Some of the many campgrounds in the Somerset district are open seasonally and all offer their own charms. The popular Bee Rock campground, for instance, provides a stunning view of dramatic rocks and cliffs along the Rockcastle River. Hikers also eagerly explore the Natural Arch, a 50- by 90-foot stone arch formed by the erosion of wind, water and ice.

Let’s Not Forget the Golfing

Somerset is every golfer’s dream. With two public and three semiprivate 18-hole courses, the Somerset area has established a solid reputation among golfers across Kentucky and the surrounding region for its challenging and beautiful courses. The Eagle’s Nest Country Club, a semiprivate course built in 1978, has some rare features, such as holes one and 10. The holes are parallel to one another and both are played over a ravine. No matter what the skill level, there’s easily a course to match in Pulaski County. And no matter what interest, anyone can find a favorite pastime in Somerset.

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