Lakes, Mountains Tempt Residents To Stay Outdoors

Havasu Island Golf Course overlooks Lake Havasu's Thompson Bay.
Havasu Island Golf Course overlooks Lake Havasu's Thompson Bay.

When you head to Lake Havasu City and Kingman, wear your bathing suit, put the convertible top down and slather on a lot of sunscreen.

In this corner of the world, outdoor recreation is so inviting, it’s practically mandatory.

“K” is for “Kingman” and “k” is for “kicks” – which is exactly what you might find yourself enjoying in this little Route 66 town. Standing proudly on the nation’s Mother Road, Kingman is home to the Route 66 Museum, a shrine to the great American road trip. If you happen to be in town in May, you might catch the Historic Route 66 Fun Run, when classic cars make the pilgrimage down America’s Main Street, right through Kingman.

The city is also surrounded by beautiful desert mountains, invigorating on foot or from a windy mountain drive.

If you’re not the road warrior type, fortunately you're in the midst of Lake Havasu and its eponymous state park, namesake of Lake Havasu City. In a town that averages 300 days of sunshine a year, you’re almost certain to hit the water on a gorgeous day.

The unique lake surrounded by vast desert offers visitors 450 miles of sparkling coast, drawing swimmers, fishers, water-skiers and plain old admirers and earning the lake its reputation as the “Personal Watercraft Capital of the World.” Forgot to pack your jet ski? No worries – you can rent just about every kind of watercraft you can imagine, from paddleboats to houseboats.

The shore of Lake Havasu is lined with challenging hikes, abundant bird watching and historic artifacts, examples of the community’s diverse recreation options. Tourists flock to the city throughout the year, but solitude is never far away in such an expansive region.

Both Lake Havasu City and Kingman also offer plenty of city-limits recreation, including several parks and multiple golf courses in each community.

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