RX For Care: How the Greater Daytona Region is Finding the Cure

The Greater Daytona Region’s two major health systems meet the needs of a growing community.

By
Teree Caruthers
On Tuesday, April 28, 2020 - 00:32
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Access to quality care often tops the list of prerequisites for relocating businesses and talent, and the Greater Daytona Region is making the mark.

In addition to encouraging wellness through resources such as the Florida Health Care Plans, which offers programs that emphasize preventative care, the region boasts two thriving health care systems that provide residents with state-of-the- art, personalized care close to home.

Safety First

Operating five hospitals in the Greater Daytona Region, including facilities in Daytona Beach, DeLand, Orange City and New Smyrna Beach, AdventHealth is the largest health care system in north-central Florida, with nearly 2,000 beds.

The largest of the system’s hospitals, the 327-bed AdventHealth Daytona Beach, features medical specialties that include bariatric medicine, weight loss, cancer and diabetes care as well as sports and rehabilitation medicine and orthopedics. AdventHealth partnered with Volusia County Schools to coordinate care for the system’s 5,000 student-athletes.

Each of AdventHealth’s hospitals in the region received an “A” in The Leapfrog Group’s spring 2019 Hospital Safety Grade, which surveys more than half the hospitals in the country to determine how safe they are for patients.

Ed Noseworthy, CEO of AdventHealth Daytona Beach, says the hospital’s exceptional care beginswith its exceptional staff.

“One of the reasons we’ve been consistently earning an ‘A’ from Leapfrog is due to the quality processes and rigors we’ve put in place. We’ve made patient safety part of our culture,” Noseworthy says.

Community Focused

Halifax Health operates two major medical centers — the flagship Halifax Health Medical Center in Daytona Beach and Halifax Health Medical Center of Port Orange — as well as more than two dozen specialty centers, children’s hospitals and behavioral health centers.

While the health system boasts a large presence in the region, Bob Williams, Halifax Health’s vice president of population health and business development, says the system has maintained its community-minded mission.

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“We’re owned by the community, and we’ve been here since 1928 serving everyone in the community, regardless of their ability to pay. Over the last year, we’ve provided $45 million worth of uncompensated care to the people of our region, which is more than all the other hospitals in the county combined,” Williams says. “When businesses and families are relocating to a community, they want to know they’re going to have good care. So, while we have going on 100 years of serving people regardless of their ability to pay, we’re by no means an indigent hospital. We provide world-class services.”

Among those services are a heart and vascular surgery program affiliated with the University of Florida’s UF Health as well as the only kidney transplant program in the region.

“When businesses and families are relocating to a community, they want to know they’re going to have good care.”

Bob Williams, Halifax Health

“We also are the only Level II trauma center in the four-county region; we’re the only Level III neonatal intensive care unit in the area; and we are the only comprehensive stroke program offering interventional radiology in the area,” Williams says.

Growing Strong

Williams says as the region’s population grows, the health system is meeting demand by expanding services and real estate. Halifax Health is building a third medical center, a 95-bed hospital in Deltona.

“Over the last decade or so it’s kind of become a bedroom community for the North Orlando area, so its population has grown faster. Daytona Beach is still the center of commerce, but in terms of occupants, Deltona has become the biggest city, and they invited Halifax Health to come and serve in their city,” he says.

Williams says another way the health system is meeting the needs of a growing population is through its residency program.

“We have the first accredited family practice residency program in the state, which means we are producing family primary care physicians and family physicians for our area,” he says. “We are in a huge shortage for primary care physicians, and Halifax Health has and will maintain a residency program to make sure we’re providing access as (our community) grows.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Teree Caruthers is a communications and content marketing professional with more than 15 years of experience creating engaging content for corporate clients and nonprofit organizations across the c