Maury County is Focused on the Future

Infrastructure upgrades and community improvement projects move Maury County forward.

By
Kevin Litwin
On Monday, July 6, 2020 - 13:04
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From new housing developments to retail, office and industrial space to transportation infrastructure, waves of renovations are rippling through the Maury County area, as this fast-growing region works to stay in top shape for its ever-changing population.

“Maury County is one of the most affordable options in the Nashville MSA, and residential growth, along with commercial strength, has been especially noticeable throughout the entire county over the past 12 to 18 months,” says Wil Evans, president of the Maury County Chamber & Economic Alliance. “It all started in Spring Hill, then moved into Columbia, and it is now working its way to Mt. Pleasant in the southern portion of the county.”

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Daniel Rivera

Stirrings in Spring Hill, Columbia

One of the biggest changes taking place in the city of Spring Hill is a 1.3-mile expansion and widening of Saturn Parkway, the four-lane divided highway that connects Interstate 65 to the General Motors Spring Hill Manufacturing Plant. The extension, which began in 2018 and is expected to be completed in 2020, will improve safety and connectivity and reduce traffic and travel time.

“Maury County has long advocated the Saturn Parkway extension to alleviate truck traffic from GM suppliers traveling along Beechcroft Road, Main Street and Stephen P. Yokich Parkway,” Evans says. “This project will improve safety and operations for both local and industrial traffic and promote more economic opportunities for GM suppliers.”

New residential developments are popping up across Maury County. Developer Ole South is building new homes in Spring Hill’s Derryberry Estates neighborhood as well as launching a new community nearby called Brandon Woods. In Columbia, The Farm at Golston Hill, a 192-unit, eight-building apartment complex, opened in August 2019.

Also making news in Columbia is a $100,000 Commercial Façade Improvement Grant that was awarded to the city to help improve commercial buildings in its historic downtown district. The grant can be used for paint projects, brick repair and awning, sign, window and door upgrades. The grant requires a 25% match by each property owner who wishes to take advantage of the opportunity.

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Photo & Styling by Faded Farmhouse

Downtown Turnaround

Following the establishment of the Mt. Pleasant Community Development Corp. in 2009, the city of Mt. Pleasant has launched a number of downtown revitalization efforts. In recent years, the group has secured various grants of $10,000-$25,000 for building façade improvements, and in late 2018, the city was awarded a $1.25 million grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation to put toward downtown streetscaping, such as new sidewalks, utilities, and sewer and water lines.

While the city has made progress, the drive to turn it around continues today.

“We are working on an application process to become a designated Tennessee Main Street district, and we now have an Airbnb property in downtown Mt. Pleasant that is full just about every weekend,” says Donna Morency, director of the Mt. Pleasant Community Development Corp. “In addition, the city has recently welcomed seven new retail stores along Main Street and the Public Square.”

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Nathan Lambrecht

One of these new stores is Breckenridge Baby Boutique.

“I’m a Mt. Pleasant native who loves this small town and wants to see it thriving,” says Kendra Nowlin, owner of Breckenridge Baby Boutique. “I started Breckenridge Baby in 2017 when the downtown was first experiencing growth in retail, and all of the small businesses have collaborated in marketing ourselves.”

Nowlin says her business has seen exponential growth with walk-in traffic and has established a niche on the internet.

“I’ve seen more than a tenfold increase in sales over the last two years, and in November 2018, we moved into a larger location on the square to provide more merchandise and a wider variety for customers to choose from,” she says. “As for downtown, I want it to maintain its small-town charm and local entrepreneurs, while growing into a destination for shopping, dining and exploring.”

If you'd like to learn more about the Maury County area, check out the latest edition of Livability: Maury County Business

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kevin Litwin is the author of Crazy Lucky Dead and a freelance feature writer with a career spanning more than 20 years.